Stop $1 billion in cuts to schools & services

FAQ

Doesn’t Prop 5 protect seniors from paying higher property taxes (or a “moving penalty”) when they move?

No. There’s no such thing as a “moving penalty.” Realtors, the only sponsors of Prop 5, made that up.

Homeowners over 55 can already keep their lower tax bill when they buy a home equal to or lesser than the value of their current home. Many seniors have used this protection to downsize and use their home equity for retirement, or move closer to family, since dramatic increases in home values have provided many California homeowners with a nice profit.

The protection that allows homeowners to move closer to family or use their home equity for retirement without paying higher property taxes is already in the California Constitution, and not in question.

Prop 5 is a new tax break that gives the wealthiest property owners the biggest benefit, but does nothing for the vast majority of seniors who are homeowners or renters. That’s why the California Congress of Seniors OPPOSES Prop 5.

Prop 5 allows wealthy property owners over 55 to get a new tax break every time they buy a bigger, more expensive house anywhere in the state.

Doesn’t Prop 5 protect people with disabilities from paying higher property taxes (or a “moving penalty”) when they move?

No. There’s no such thing as a “moving penalty.” Realtors, the only sponsors of Prop 5, made that up.

People with severe disabilities can already keep their lower tax bill when they downsize to withdraw home equity, buy a smaller, more manageable home, or move closer to family. This protection is already in the California Constitution , and not in question.

Prop 5 is a new tax break that gives the wealthiest property owners the biggest benefit, but does nothing for the vast majority of people with severe disabilities who are homeowners or renters.

Prop 5 allows certain wealthy property owners to get a new tax break every time they buy a bigger, more expensive house anywhere in the state.

Hundreds of people have lost their homes in recent wildfires. Doesn’t Prop 5 protect them from paying more taxes when they rebuild?

No. Voters already approved a change to the California Constitution to allow victims of disasters to rebuild their home without paying higher property taxes.

Prop 5 is something very different -- it gives a new tax break to allow for the building of a bigger, more expensive home.

How does this measure affect Prop 13?

This measure does nothing to affect existing Prop 13 protections for homeowners. Prop 5 is a new tax benefit for a select few Californians.

Who is behind Prop 5?

Realtors wrote Prop 5 to benefit Realtors, and a few wealthy property owners. Every time an expensive house changes hands, Realtors make more money. That’s why the California Realtors Association is the only sponsor of Prop 5 and has already spent more than $7 million to pass it.

Are the Realtors really pushing this measure this year? They’ve filed another measure for 2020 in case Prop 5 doesn’t pass.

That’s a question for the Realtors. What we do know is that Prop 5 is on the ballot this year and voters will face a Yes or No question on Prop 5 no matter what. With the Realtors having spent $7 million on Prop 5 so far, and with so much at stake for our schools and local services, we are going to be working hard to make sure Californians know what Prop 5 means for California: upwards of $1 billion drained from schools and local services every year.